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20121201
20121201
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 10:30pm EST
the assad regime. the nature of the syrian revolution has no discrimination against any minorities. this is why we do not have any fear that specific actions will be taken against minorities, against christians. we do not forget at the same assad -- if you are the assad regime, but it belongs to the alawites. if you are made specific group within the alawite community, you are investing in the civil war. there is a fear about the future of the alawite community. since many from the community, they played a role killing other syrians for money, for support from the security forces. but we are committed to the syrians for all. we are proposing within the opposition a program called a transitional justice that can assure all the minorities to be a part from syria -- in 1956 the prime minister, the majority of the christians. a minority of the minority. even that as he became prime minister for two terms. the muslims have 4 seats in parliament and this supported his positions. in syria we did not have a history of civil war. many changes in the social fabric. i think the nature of the
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 7:00pm PST
president bashar al assad out of office and ultimately end the bloodshed. on one hand, they're strengthening sanctions. on the other, they're reaffirming their support for opposition forces. nhk world's akira saheki reports. >> reporter: delegates from more than 60 countries are attending the conference, including representatives from the gulf region and the west. they've met several times before, but this is the first time they've gathered in asia. the japanese government hosted the conference to help broaden the base of international support for sanctions against syria. >> translator: the international community has been asking the syrian government to end the violence. but the assad regime is continuing the fight, ignoring the sacrifices of its people. we need to unify our efforts and put pressure on the syrian government. >> reporter: delegates are trying to do just that. they're working to strengthen existing sanctions by creating a larger coalition and improving coordination between participating countries. >> the sanctions have been very effective. the regime lots its revenues in term
Current
Dec 1, 2012 1:00am PST
syrian people. the reason for doing this, they need to push assad out as quickly as possible. he's holding on, and if something doesn't change in this equilibrium he may hold on for months on end. this war could spread in lebanon, jordan, iraq, that's not in the interest of the united states. they need to reinforce this coalition. that's one reason. the other is one of self interest. it's likely that at some point assad is going to fall. this particular group or some element of it will take over as the government of syria. we should want to have influence there given the importance of syria, and the importance of syria to iran. because if we can separate a new syrian government from the iranians that would be a major strategic advantage to the united states. >> eliot: michael, it certainly does seem that the trendline is not favorable to assad, that's good news. but is this another instance where we've been leading from have been perhaps one step too late and have not been forthright enough in supporting the opposition? >> you know, that may be, and i'm not surprised and i don't th
CNN
Nov 30, 2012 11:00pm PST
. ♪ >>> our second story "outfront," panic in syria. at this moment tonight, there is fear the assad regime is getting desperate, so today, much of the country experienced a second day without internet access. it's a pretty incredible thing. i just want to show you this chart. internet activity was going up and up, then off. can you just imagine life in that situation? no one is sure why and as violence continues on the ground, there's a debate at home as to whether even at this what seems to be late hour, that the united states should get involved. senators have repeatedly called for the united states to arm the rebel forces, but the administration is not yet ready to do it. >> will providing arms to the opposition convince the people who support bashar al assad in many cases because they are afraid of their own existence, or will it simply lead to more fighting? that is the question that we are considering. >> it's a crucial question. "outfront" tonight, alex, author and former reporter for the "the new york times" and seth jones. good to see you. seth, there's a lot of things we don't know
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
, came as a consequence of the assad regime. the syrian revolution started as a peaceful revolution, from march 2011 until september 2011. until september, more than 4200 has been killed in these peaceful demonstrations, with the systematic killing machine of the assad regime. in september, some army officials who refused to open fire on their brothers or fellow citizens decided to form what is called the free syrian army. this free syrian army played a role, from september until december, in defending and protecting the peaceful demonstrations in different areas. with the troops and attacks from the regime, that encourage the free syrian army to play a role in trying to get an offensive role, to allow more protection to the syrian people. that increase of the airforce from the regime -- that left the free syrian army more responsibilities to protect and defend the syrian people. we see the terminology, of the syrian revolution changes the dynamics from peaceful demonstration. the creation of the free syrian army played a defensive role. the free syrian army became the heroes of the
FOX News
Dec 1, 2012 1:00pm PST
opposition forces say that they could accept an international peace keeping force if president assad steps aside. meanwhile, a u.s.-based monitor confirms the country's two-day internet blackout is now over. conner powell is live for us in the region with the very latest. conner? >> heather, the internet is now on in damascus, but appears much of the rest of syria is still without internet and other mobile phone connection. the assad government blamed that disconnection on terrorists, but outside monitoring groups say no, in fact it's the assad regime that cut the connection. the question is why would they do that? we've seen more and more fighting getting closer and closer to damascus. particularly into the areas where the government is the strongest, like around the airport, which has been open and planes have been coming and going since the start of this war nearly two years ago. in the last two days, fighting has gotten particularly heavy and flights have been canceled out of the international airport. the rebels at one point claimed to have held the road going to the airport. th
FOX News
Nov 30, 2012 4:00pm PST
? >> well, shepard, president assad and his supporters have managed to hold on to power despite the internal pressure domestically and international pressure on his regime. there are signs though who point to things being more shaky in sierra than we may have previously thought. in the past 24 hours. the damas tus international airport which had been firmly in control of the government has taken rebel fighter, mortars landed on the run way yesterday. the main road leading to the airport was closed for much of yesterday because of heavy fighting between rebels and government forces. now, we're also hearing that the internet has been shut off for the second day in a row. more than 90% of internet connections across syria are out. now, it appears that the assad government has shut down the internet. in large part because rebels seem to be making advancements towards damascus and other government held areas. it is seen that this is a possible move to try to slow that advancement. shepard. >> shepard: nato getting more and more involved now, right? >> that's right. nato is not getting di
CNN
Dec 1, 2012 3:00pm PST
clearing the villages around it of assad's forces and positioning rebel snipers in the area. they waited for their enemy to weaken. the government would try to airdrop supplies from helicopters, they didn't dare land he says. and most times they would miss. and we would take the foot. it was inedible. dozens defected. and even more we are told were killed. the final battle to take this massive base lasted 24 hours. rebel fighters used artillery they captured from another unit on the base, firing it into the building and ending the battle. for this rebel unit there was a treasure trove of weaponry. and most important of all, anti-aircraft missiles. hundreds of them. though not all functioning, the fighters tell us. video posted to youtube right after the assault took place, shows stacks of metal boxes packed with soviet era anti-aircraft missiles. another video posted is explaining how to arm and launch the missiles and ensure that they're locked in on their target. the regime still has the military advantage, thanks to the sheer size of its arsenal. the balance it seems may have ever so
CNN
Nov 30, 2012 5:00pm PST
meddleing in the future so that could potentially make it very tricky if and when the assad regime falls to forge relationships with the potentially new syrian government that is going to be formed. but as one person was saying to me, how many people need to die, what is that number of syrians that need to die for countries like the u.s. to actually take action and that's really a question that we can't answer for them. >> well, arwa damon, stay safe, okay? thank you. >>> coming up, a custody battle over a little girl named veronica could be heading to the supreme court. it's because she was taken away from the only parents she ever knew and she was returned to her biological father, though she had never met him. it was all under a little-known law that's designed to keep native american children in native american homes, but is it the right thing to do? we will update you, next. i hav, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-s
CNN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00am PST
clear. but others say it is the work of bashar al-assad's regime. most of those killed in and around syria and aleppo, cnn's arwa damon visited aleppo, and found a nation gripped by civil war. >> reporter: to the tune of jingle bell, a chant in aleppo, with original lyrics. hand in hand, we are all hand in hand, they say, until we get rid of assad. the overwhelming crowd here, for democracy, but also some carrying black flags for islamists. let's agree that each has a right to their perspective. a show of unity, but later islamist groups take up their own chant. the people want an islamic state. when we say we want an islamic state, it means that every citizen will have their rights, he says. islam respects the rights of others, but according to their interpretation. one says, i should cover my hair. twenty-five-year-old hussain says he is not worried they will take over the country. syria is beautiful, a nation of many colors, he says, whether they like it or not. what we just witnessed is a microcosm of a larger dynamic in syria, and the country's future challenges, amid the calls
CNN
Dec 1, 2012 7:00am PST
the u.s. will be a representative of syrians. as damascus is pounded by president bashar al assad's forces, they are voicing their hopes for a better future. arwa damon has the story. >> reporter: to the tune of "jingle bells," a tune in aleppo with original lyrics. hand in hand, we are all hand in hand, they sing, until we get rid of bashar. the bulk of the car here, pro-democracy. but also some carrying black flags. let's agree that each has a right to their perspective. later the islamists take up their own chant. the people want an islamic state. when we sing we want an islamic state, it means that every citizen will have their rights. but according to their own interpretation. one of the islamists says that i should cover my hair. 25-year-old hussein says the islamists are being nurtured by outside forces. but he's not worried they will take over the country. syria is beautiful, a nation of many colors, whether they like it or not. what we just witnessed s a microcosm of a larger dynamic in syria and the country's future challenges. amidst the fall of the regime, criticism of s
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)